Fatal workplace injuries declined massively between 2006 and 2009. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that there were 5,840 deadly accidents in 2006, and the numbers had been rising for years. Then came a dramatic decline, hitting just 4,551 deadly workplace injuries in 2009.

Between 2009 and 2015, things stayed pretty even. There were some rises and falls, but the total stayed under 4,900 the entire time.

Then came 2016, the last year for which complete data has been released, and there was a notable jump. Workplace fatalities leapt back up over 5,000 for the first time in eight years, hitting 5,190. While self-employed workers stayed roughly the same, those on salaries or getting hourly pay saw the bulk of the change.

It was a dangerous year for workers, and it does raise some important questions about safety standards.

That being said, these are raw numbers and overall totals. They’re not adjusted to compare to the total amount of workers. Is it a coincidence that the number of injuries declined in 2009, in the heart of the recession, and then started rising again as the country moved out of that recession? It could just be that more people are working again, which means the amount of deadly accidents must rise.

Regardless, the statistics do show why it is so important for those who lose a loved one on the job to know all of their legal rights. Compensation may be needed for medical bills, funeral costs, lost wages and more. If you have any questions, our website can offer plenty of valuable information.