What are some fault grounds for a Pennsylvania divorce?

| Jun 7, 2019 | Family Law |

Getting a divorce is not quite as simple as it was in bygone days. Those considering a permanent split must make several important decisions before the process even begins. One of these decisions involves deciding whether or not to base a divorce on fault. A family law attorney can provide you with detailed guidance about pursuing a fault divorce. In the interim, this blog post will familiarize you with the grounds necessary for such a divorce.

In order for a family law court to approve a fault divorce, your spouse must have engaged in one or more activities that “injured” you. Below, you will find a brief outline of the fault grounds available to injured spouses.

  • Adultery: Unlike some other states, Pennsylvania allows a couple to divorce on the grounds of cheating.
  • Abandonment: If your spouse has deserted you without a reasonable reason for at least one year, you may pursue a divorce on this ground.
  • Endangerment: This ground typically involves your spouse treating you cruelly or perhaps endangering your life or your health through violence.
  • Bigamy: If your spouse marries another without getting divorced first, you can seek a split based on such actions.
  • Intolerability: Getting divorced under this ground involves showing that your spouse forced you to live in intolerable conditions.
  • Imprisonment: If a court convicted your spouse of a crime resulting in at least two years in prison, it is possible to seek a fault divorce on such grounds.

The information in this post should give you an idea of when you can seek a divorce based on spousal fault. This can help you begin your divorce with the best chances of getting through the process as smoothly as possible.