How are the child’s best interests considered?

| Nov 7, 2019 | Family Law |

It’s not easy to be a parent. Unless it makes individuals happier and more likely to be focus on parental duties, divorce does not help. The process is difficult on the emotions of children and adults alike, and the laws that govern children’s fates can be complicated.

What are the issues that need to be decided during divorce?

When it comes to children, the main issues are support and custody. Child support provides a minor’s needs like clothing, shelter, education and health care. In some cases, money alone may fulfill this responsibility. Child custody has more to do with where and how a child lives.

How is child custody decided in Pennsylvania?

Custody proceedings in the Keystone State are decided along the lines of the Uniform Child Custody Act, making it similar to other states. The main issue that family courts use to decide child custody is the best interests of the child in question.

How are best interests judged in a family court?

The relationships that a child has built with adults, and vice versa, are a major consideration, as they will shape the child’s upbringing. The location of possible homes also matters, especially for access to vital services. The child’s own wishes may also be considered within reason.

Can parents make a case for serving these best interests?

Parents and other interested parties may address a family court in Pennsylvania, possibly with the help of an attorney. A lawyer may be able to present the right evidence to show the court the best future for a child after divorce.